Tag Archives: Song Thrush

Dawn in Mid-February

Dawn on a Sunday in mid-February arrived in a grey pall. A frost has etched its way through the garden and the air was still. But the sound of birdsong has gathered new strength; the Sing Thrush which has claimed … Continue reading

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Birdsong returns to the village, briefly

This morning, for seemingly the first time in weeks, bird song returned to the garden. Firstly, a hardy and optimistic Song Thrush took up a favourite perch high in a Maple and practiced his lines. Then Robins duetted. All was … Continue reading

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Repetition

The Song Thrush is the master of the dawn chorus at this time of the year. The Blackbird tends to favour the evening chorus, presumably because of child-rearing duties. This Thrush uses repetition as the main theme of its song. … Continue reading

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Broken silences

At a certain point the balance tips. Early this morning, in spite of the dark and the persistent drizzly rain, a Song Thrush was singing in full voice. It is as if the bird’s determination to express itself would overcome … Continue reading

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Caution Mermaid crossing

After some dull February days it came as a relief this morning to feel that Spring is really happening. The intensity of bird song has increased – the Skylarks of the Town field were in full song and a bolshie … Continue reading

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Dawn on a rainy saturday

In the subdued pre-dawn light, the variety of bird song is gradually increasing. The robins, now well established, defend their bubbles of territory. In the rain a Song Thrush adds to the mix, perhaps for the first time this year, … Continue reading

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Waiting for Spring in February

Strong warm westerly winds bring about changes. Although a few stragglers may remain, it seems that the majority of the winter thrushes (Redwings and Fieldfares) have move back towards their summer quarters. I assume that they are in transit to … Continue reading

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